Assessment Centres | The Careers Service Assessment Centres – Oxford University Careers Service
Oxford logo
The basics

Many employers believe that individual interviews can’t tell them enough about candidates and so prefer to use a range of selection techniques – this series of selection techniques are often incorporated into an assessment centre. Assessment centres are considered by many employers to be the fairest and most accurate method of selecting staff, because they give different selectors a chance to see candidates over a longer period of time than is possible in a single interview. It gives them the opportunity to see what you can do, rather than what you say you can do, in a variety of situations. Selectors at assessment centres will measure you against a series of competencies that are relevant to the organisation and each activity will be carefully designed to assess one or more of these areas.

The length of assessment centres can vary, however they typically last from half to a whole day. The type of activities vary according to the employers, but can include aptitude tests, personality questionnaires, business games, case studies, group discussions, presentations, one-to-one interviews, socialising and meeting current employees. Assessment centres are usually held either on company premises or in a nearby location. Depending on their size, organisations are likely to run a number of assessment centres, and will invite a set number of candidates to each.

It is also worth remembering that you are usually being assessed against specific competencies and not against the other candidates. In organisations making multiple hires, it is not unheard of, for every candidate from one assessment centre to be selected and nobody from another. Rather than trying to compete with other candidates, make sure that you demonstrate the qualities that the organisation has highlighted as important to them.

Once you have been invited to an assessment centre, make sure that you understand the structure of the day(s) beforehand eg: will it involve interviews, group exercises, presentations etc?. If you don’t have this information, contact the recruiter to find out, as you will need it to prepare properly.

Activities at assessment centres

A combination of the following activities may be used:

Psychometric & aptitude tests

These are timed (often multiple choice) tests, taken under examination conditions, and designed to measure your intellectual capability for thinking and reasoning. The tests will be carefully designed for the role you have applied to and although challenging, will not usually depend on any prior knowledge or experience. Firms will sometimes provide links to sample questions, alternatively you can look for some on-line. Even if the firm doesn’t provide you with sample questions you should still be able to find other practice tests on-line that assess the same or similar competencies.

Prior to sitting a test try to ensure  you:

  • Practice beforehand, in similar conditions that you would face on the assessment day eg: time yourself, with numerical tests – practice without using a calculator
  • On the day of the test:
    • pay careful attention to the instructions and ask for clarification if you don’t understand them
    • be aware of the time limit and work as quickly and accurately as you can.

For more information, see our webpage on psychometric tests.

In-tray / e-tray exercises

This exercise is now commonly carried out on a computer, but may be on paper. You will have access to an email in-box where messages, reports and telephone queries will appear. You will be expected to take decisions on each item: deciding priorities, drafting replies, delegating tasks, recommending action to superiors, and so on. The exercise is designed to test how you handle complex information within a limited time period, so organisations will be looking to see how you perform under pressure. Some organisations will also want to know why you have made certain decisions and may ask you to annotate items or discuss your actions in a follow-up discussion.

Case studies

In this exercise you will usually be set a task/problem that is reflective of the type of work you will be expected to do if you were to join the firm. The case study can take place within a range of different contexts eg: an interview, a group exercise, presentation or as a written exercise.

In this exercise you are being tested on your ability to analyse information, to think clearly and logically, to work under time pressure, to exercise your judgement and to express yourself on paper or verbally (see ‘Presentations’ below). Case studies are often designed so there isn’t one obvious right answer and the selectors will be looking to see how you have come to your solution / decision and that you can justify your recommendations. Each organisation will develop case studies that reflect the type of work that they do. See our website for further information on Consulting Case Studies and Legal Case Studies

Interviews

Interviews that take place as part of an assessment centre can vary eg:  these could be competency based or technical, with one interviewer or a panel. If you have already had an interview prior to the assessment centre, these are likely to be much more in-depth than those you experienced during the first stages of selection and could be with someone from the department/division to which you are applying. Interviewers may take the opportunity to probe further on the answers you gave at an earlier interview, so reflect back and think about answers you have previously given. Questions may also refer back to other assessment centre activities you have taken part in or to aptitude test results. Be prepared to be challenged on your answers, but keep calm, consider your answers, and avoid being defensive. You may be asked many of the same questions that you were asked previously. Don’t assume that your interviewer is familiar with the answers you gave at that stage, treat this subsequent discussion independently. See our interview webpages for further information.

Information sessions

These provide you with more information about the organisation and the job roles available. Listen carefully, as such information is likely to be more up-to-date than your previous research and may be useful for subsequent interviews. If you are unclear about anything – ask.

Social events

These give you the opportunity to meet a variety of people – including other candidates, the selectors, recent graduates, and senior management. They are excellent opportunities for you to find out more about the organisation, and to ask questions in an informal setting. Although these events may be billed as informal and not a part of the assessment process, you should still behave in a way that will reflect well on you.

Presentations

You may be asked to give a short presentation to the other candidates and the selectors at your assessment centre on a subject of your choice or one chosen by the employer. This could be prepared in advance or you may be given time to prepare it on the day – whatever the case, make sure that you follow their instructions and advice on the presentation content, timing structure etc. It’s very important to think of your potential audience and ensure that the audience will understand the topic and your arguments. Try to avoid talking about anything too commonplace or technical, but remember that you could be asked supplementary questions, so try to learn as much about your subject as you possibly can. Although the content of the presentation may be relevant to the role you have applied for, the organisation will also be assessing whether you can structure a talk and communicate information effectively.

Planning

  • You can plan your presentation along the following “A-B-C” lines:
    • A – tell them what you’re going to tell them (Introduction)
    • B – tell them (Content)
    • C – tell them what you’ve told them. (Summary)
  • Limit your points to key messages c. three to six (depending on subject matter)
  • Pitch the level of your talk at your audience and keep it clear.
  • Support your ideas and themes with (brief) anecdotes, examples, statistics and facts.
  • Consider your timing, and note how long each part of your presentation should take.

The presentation

  • Aim for a conversational delivery and avoid memorising, or reading from a full script of notes.
  • Talk to the group – not at it.
  • Speak clearly, don’t gabble or mumble, and make sure that you can be heard by all of the audience.
  • Keep to time. Bear in mind that your nerves can speed you up or slow you down on the day.
  • Try to make eye contact with all members of the group you are presenting to. If you are presenting to a large audience you don’t have to make eye contact with each individual person, however ensure that you address the different sections of the audience.
  • Be aware of your body language and don’t fidget as you talk.
  • Flipcharts and PowerPoint slides can greatly enhance your presentation, but should be used with care – let them illustrate rather than repeat what you are saying.
  • Images are generally more effective than words.
  • Don’t overcrowd your visual aids – you want your audience to be listening to you, not reading!
  • Avoid reading your visual aids out loud to your audience.

Questions

At the end of your presentation, it’s often a good idea to ask if the audience have any questions. The following mnemonic “TRACT” could be helpful when you frame your answers:

  • Thank the questioner
  • Repeat the question for the rest of the audience (clarify at this point if you are unsure of what you are being asked)
  • Answer the question to the group
  • Check with the questioner that they are satisfied
  • Thank them again
Group activities

Most graduate jobs will involve working with other people in some way and most assessment centres include a group or teamwork exercise. Whether you have to complete a practical task or take part in a discussion, the selectors will be looking for your ability to work well with the group. It is important to remember that good team work is not necessarily about getting your ideas taken forward, but also listening to, acknowledging, encouraging and following through the ideas of others in the group.

There are some basic rules to follow in this type of exercise:

  • Get a good grasp of any information you are given, but don’t waste time on minute details.
  • In light of the information given, decide your objectives and priorities, then make a plan and follow it. This will ensure the group does not stray away from the original brief.
  • Be assertive and persuasive, but also diplomatic – be tactful even when faced with an idea you do not wholly agree with. Try to speak with conviction about your ideas.
  • Listen to what everyone else has to say and try to get the best contribution from everyone in the group. Don’t assume that shy or quiet members have nothing to contribute.
  • Find the balance between taking your ideas forward and helping the group to complete the task constructively.
  • Make sure the group keeps to their objective and time limits.
  • Keep your cool and don’t panic!

Discussions & role plays

You may be asked to take part in a role-playing exercise where you will be given a briefing pack and asked to play the part of a particular person. The selectors will be assessing your individual contribution to the discussion/role play, your verbal communication and interpersonal skills. You are usually given some time to read the background information and to try and pre-empt some possible challenges you may face and how you may respond. Some scenarios for role plays can include: defending a decision you made to a client or more senior member of the team; dealing with an angry client or customer; or negotiating with a supplier.

Practical tasks

Occasionally for roles which require a specific technical skill, you may be asked as a group to use unfamiliar equipment or materials to make/build something. The selectors are often as interested in how the group interacts as in the quality of the finished product, but they will also be assessing your planning and problem-solving skills and the creativity of your individual ideas. As with any group activity, get involved – even if you are unsure about the relevance of the task.

Top tips for assessment centres
  • Make sure you know what exercises/tests you will be be expected to complete and prepare thoroughly for them
  • Don’t worry if you think that you have performed badly in a particular exercise in the assessment centre. It is more than likely that you will have the chance to compensate in other exercises
  • Remember, the aim is to perform to the best of our abilities (not to compete with the other candidates)
  • If you are unsuccessful, remember to ask for feedback; most firms will give you feedback on your performance at the assessment centre stage and this will help to enhance your performance in the future
  • If after receiving your feedback, you are still unsure about how to improve your future performance in assessment centres, book an appointment to speak to a Careers Adviser who may be able to provide additional tips and suggestions.
Our resources

Related pages

  • The advice given in our Interviews webpages may also be useful if you are preparing to attend an assessment centre.
  • Our Interview Question Database will also contain any information we may have about the exercises used by the organisation to which you have applied.

Events

You may wish to attend some of the workshops/events we run in Michaelmas and Hilary Terms at the Careers Service – take a look at our term calendar to find out more.

We also regularly run workshops that can help you to prepare for assessment centres:  search CareerConnect for dates:

Books

The following books are available in our Resource Centre:

  • You’re Hired! Assessment Centres, Ceri Roderick
  • 101 Answers to the Toughest Interview Questions (6th ed). Ron Fry
  • Brilliant Interview (3rd ed), Ros Jay
  • The Interview Book (2nd ed), James Innes

External resources
This information was last updated on 06 September 2018.
Loading... Please wait
Recent blogs about Assessment Centres

Free Practice for Psychometric Recruitment Tests

Blogged by Hugh Nicholson-Lailey on 12/09/2018.

Since the beginning of September, your Careers Service is providing free access to a comprehensive range of practice materials to help students and alumni prepare for the recruitment tests commonly used by companies in recruitment.

This service provided by JobTestPrep covers pretty much the full spectrum of recruitment psychometric tests and also includes practice materials specifically developed to mirror the tests used by individual named companies. So whether you are looking to prepare for verbal and numerical reasoning tests, or e-tray exercises, or the Watson Glaser tests used by nearly all law firms, the free access we provide will help you to prepare and practise.

Matriculated students and alumni must apply to the Careers Service for an Access Code. This will give you 12 months free access to the site from the first time that you log in with the code. To request a code, sign-in to your Oxford CareerConnect account and submit a query via the Queries tab using the title: Request for JobTestPrep Access Code.

An additional free resource offering a whole bank of tests is provided for us by Practice Aptitude Tests, and this can be accessed by anyone who has an Oxford University email address. To access this service, simply register using an email address that ends .ox.ac.uk. 

Full advice is given in our briefing on Psychometric Tests.

Work Experience Programme for Disabled Students

Posted on behalf of Leonard Cheshire: Change 100. Blogged by Polly Metcalfe on 10/09/2018.

Change100 is a programme of paid summer work placements and mentoring.

It’s 100 days of work experience that can kickstart your career!

Change100 aims to remove barriers experienced by disabled people in the workplace, to allow them to achieve their potential. They partner with 90 organisations including Barclays, the BBC, Skanska & Lloyds who believe disability isn’t a barrier to a brilliant career.

It’s designed to support the career development of talented university students and recent graduates with any disability or long-term health condition, such as:

  • physical impairments
  • sensory impairments
  • mental health conditions
  • learning disabilities or difficulties e.g. dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD
  • other long-term health conditions e.g. diabetes, MS

Who is Change100 for?

To apply to Change100, you must meet all the following criteria:

  • have a disability or long-term health condition.
  • be in your penultimate or final year of an undergraduate or postgraduate university degree, or have graduated in 2016 or 2017. Any degree subject accepted.
  • have achieved or be predicted a 2:1 or 1st in your undergraduate degree.*
  • be eligible to work in the UK for the duration of a full-time summer work placement.

*If your academic performance has been affected by mitigating circumstances related to your disability or health condition, these will be taken into account. Please get in touch to discuss this.

Applications for Summer 2019 will open on Monday 24 September and close on Wednesday 16 January 2019.

For more information and to register your interest, click here.

Free Female Leadership Event – London

Posted on behalf of Girls in Leadership UK. Blogged by Polly Metcalfe on 10/09/2018.

Girls in Leadership UK is pleased to announce their launch with the ‘Learn to Lead’ event. The evening will be packed with inspiring speakers, life-changing stories of women in leadership across different sectors including Banking and Law. Our panel of speakers will provide you with detailed and practical advice on how to lead in your chosen field as well as lessons from their leadership journeys. Learning to lead is a poetically vast and exciting theme. The discussions will leave you feeling energised and inspired for creating your own wonderful adventures at whatever stage. Attendees will also have the opportunity to network with the speakers, guests and other attendees.

Schedule

18:00-18:10 Introduction

18:10-18:20 Keynote speaker Sophie Khan

18:20-18:45 Panel Q&A

18:45-19:00 Questions from the audience

19:00-19:15 Closing remarks

19:15-20:00 Networking

The event is mainly for those at university or beyond, but you are most welcome if you think you can benefit from the discussions. Please arrive at 17:45pm for registration. Limited spaces are available so bag your tickets early to avoid any disappointment! You can sign up here.

 

Postgraduate study in Canada – EduCanada event in London

Blogged by Abby Evans on 07/09/2018.

Students and their families are invited to this completely free event at Canada House in London to learn about postgraduate study opportunities in Canada and to meet informally with Canadian universities and colleges to get any questions answered. Advance registration is required to attend – find out more and book your place here.

Seminar programme (10am – 12pm)

  • Studying in Canada: an overview of the Canadian education system
    Allison Goodings, High Commission of Canada
  • Living and Working in Canada: a guide to applying for Canadian study visas, and information on post-study visa opportunities
    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
  • How to Apply: a panel discussion on Canadian postgraduate admissions
  • Tuition and Fees: a panel discussion on finance, funding and scholarships for international postgraduate students

The main exhibition will open at 12pm, where you’ll be able to speak to the Canadian institutions who are exhibiting.The event will be held at Canada House on Trafalgar Square, a beautifully restored heritage building that now houses an impressive collection of Canadian art and design.

Bar Pro Bono Unit: Caseworker Volunteering Opportunities

Posted on behalf of Bar Pro Bono Unit. Blogged by Annie Dutton on 15/08/2018.

The Bar Pro Bono Unit is the Bar’s national charity, based in the National Pro Bono Centre on Chancery Lane, London, which helps to find pro bono legal assistance from volunteer barristers. They are seeking dedicated and enthusiastic individuals to volunteer as Academic Year Casework Volunteers 

This is a fantastic opportunity to obtain unique exposure to the Bar as a profession and to a wide range of areas of law. By volunteering you  will  learn a great deal about the practical working of the courts and the needs of litigants in person which should complement your studies.

You will be assisting the caseworkers one day per week, over a four month period. Tasks will include:

  • Drafting case summaries, using the case papers provided by individuals who need legal assistance; these case summaries are then used by experienced barristers when reviewing the file.
  • Drafting case allocation summaries which are used to try to find volunteer barristers around the country to take on the case on a pro bono basis.
  • Taking telephone calls from the public and providing updates to existing applicants.

Closing date for applications: Monday 27 August 2018 at 23:00

Requirements

You must have completed at least one year of law-related study or law-related work.

Previous volunteer’s feedback:

“I would strongly recommend to anyone interested in pursuing a legal career to try and spend some time with the BPBU. Not only does it look great on your CV, it also helps you hone crucial skills such as succinctly summarising the key facts of a case and identifying the relevant legal issues, something that should stand you in good stead for any pupillage or training contract interviews. The staff are all wonderfully welcoming and helpful, and whilst a key benefit is the range of areas you will experience (anything from Defamation to Child Protection), they will also accommodate specific requests to see more work in certain areas. Ultimately you are doing genuinely important work that makes a material difference to people’s lives, whilst being supplied with copious amounts of tea and cake. What’s not to like?”

This page displays current related blog posts. If none display, you can still stay up-to-date with our newsletter sent regularly to all Oxford students.

Older posts can be found in our archive of past blogs.