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Cover Letters | The Careers Service Cover Letters – Oxford University Careers Service
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How to write cover letters

Example cover letter

A cover letter introduces and markets you effectively by complementing your CV. It tells your story by highlighting your relevant strengths and motivation for the person and organisation you are writing to, rather than listing all the things that can already be seen on your CV.

Always take the opportunity to submit a cover letter if you are given the opportunity.

The cover letter gives you scope to showcase what interests and drives you, and your enthusiasm for an organisation and the role. You can use it to align yourself with the organisation’s strengths, values and culture, and highlight in a targeted way your knowledge and strongest, most relevant skills for the position.

The content and style are up to you, but a logical and engaging structure is key. Below are some guidelines.

Style

Try to sound professional yet conversational, rather than wordy or too stiff and formal. Write in clear, concise English – take care not to drown the reader with your detail and avoid jargon they may not understand. The Plain English Campaign has some good guidance on improving your writing style.

Content

Layout

Set it out like a business letter. Brevity adds power, so do not exceed one A4 page in length. An exception is if the job has a person specification consisting of a detailed list of skills, and selection is based on applicants demonstrating in this letter that they have them all (i.e. there is no other application form).  In that case you can exceed one page – but remember that being concise and relevant is still important!

Introduction

Introduce yourself and explain why you are writing. If you are responding to an advertisement, state where you saw it. This tells the recruiter why they are reading the letter, and it gives them feedback on which of their advertising sources are working.  Introduce yourself: what are you studying, where and which year you are in, or when you will finish.

Why this job?

Explain why you are interested in the job and the organisation. Tailor the letter to the organisation and job description and make it implicit that you have not sent out multiple copies of the same letter to different employers. If you can, say something original about the organisation: don’t just repeat the text from their publicity material.

Draw on your research, especially what you have learnt from speaking with their staff (e.g. whilst meeting them at a fair or event, or during work shadowing/experience) as this will demonstrate an awareness and understanding of them that goes beyond the corporate website. Be specific about why the position is particularly attractive for you, and back this up with evidence from your past, or by linking this to your overall career plans, and what you find exciting about this sector.

Why you?

Explain why you are well-suited to the position. Refer to the relevant skills, experience and knowledge you have and match what you say to the requirements outlined in the job description. Tell your story and highlight key evidence so that you are building on, but not using exactly the same phrases contained in your CV. Make sure you read our webpage on demonstrating you fit the job criteria for more advice.

Even if you think that this position is out of reach, your job is to convince the recruiter that you are qualified enough and able to do the job.  Focus on your accomplishments and the transferable skills that are relevant to the role. State explicitly how you match the job criteria – don’t expect the person reading your letter to infer your skills or experiences for themselves.

Support your claims by referring to examples that are already detailed in your CV. You can make a stronger, more credible case by linking different experiences that highlight similar skills or competences. For example:

  • You first demonstrated your organisational skills by creating (an event) at school, and you  have developed them further by raising (£xx) at last year’s fundraiser and, most recently, by leading (another event) for your Society attended by (number) of people.
  • The role (applied for) would allow you to use your passion for helping others, which has driven your success as College Welfare Officer and the personal sense of achievement gained from working as a peer counsellor.

Conclusion

Reiterate your desire to join the organisation and end on a ‘look forward to hearing from you’ statement, followed by ‘Yours sincerely’ if writing to a named individual, and ‘Yours faithfully’ if you have not been able to find a named contact. Type your name, but also don’t forget to sign the letter if you are printing it out.

Top tips

  • Write to a named person if you possibly can – rather than Dear Sir/Madam.
  • Check your spelling and get someone else to read it over.
  • Check that it says clearly what you want it to say.  Are there any sections that are hard to read or follow? If yes, try to simplify the language, use shorter sentences or take out that section completely.
  • Make the letter different each time. If you insert another company name, does the letter still read the same? If so, try to differentiate each letter more!
  • Don’t start every sentence with “I”.
  • Give evidence for all your claims.
  • Be enthusiastic and interested.
  • Don’t repeat your whole CV.
  • A Careers Adviser at the Careers Service can give you feedback on the content and structure of your cover letter and CV, and advise you on how best to target particular sectors – write one first and bring it to us for feedback.
Academic cover letters and statements

Academic Cover Letters

Academic cover letters vary in length, purpose, content and tone. Each job application requires a new, distinct letter. For applications that require additional research or teaching statements, there is no point repeating these points in a cover letter – here, one page is enough. Other applications ask for a CV and a cover letter only, in which case the letter will need to be longer and require more detail.

In all cases:

  • 2 pages is the maximum: show that you can prioritise according to what they are looking for
  • Your letter is a piece of academic writing – you need a strong argument and empirical evidence
  • Write for the non-expert to prove that you can communicate well
  • Make sure you sound confident by using a tone that is collegial (rather than like a junior talking to a senior)
  • Demonstrate your insight into what the recruiting department is doing in areas of research and teaching, and say what you would bring to these areas from your work thus far

Give quantifiable evidence of teaching, research and funding success where possible

Teaching Statements

What is a Teaching Statement and Why Do You Need One?

When making an academic job application, you may be asked for a teaching statement (sometimes referred to as a ‘philosophy of teaching statement’). These statements may also be requested of candidates for grant applications or teaching awards.

A teaching statement is a narrative that describes:

  • How you teach.
  • Why you teach the way you do.
  • How you know if you are an effective teacher, and how you know that your students are learning.

The rationale behind a teaching statement is to:

  • Demonstrate that you have been reflective and purposeful about your teaching. This means showing an understanding of the teaching process and your experience of this.
  • Communicate your goals as an instructor, and your corresponding actions in the laboratory, classroom, or other teaching setting.

Format and style of a Teaching Statement

There is no required content or format for a teaching statement, because they are personal in nature, but they are generally 1-2 pages, and written in first person. The statement will include teaching strategies and methods to help readers ‘see’ you in a lab, lecture hall, or other teaching setting. The teaching statement is, in essence, a writing sample, and should be written with the audience in mind (i.e. the search committee for the institution(s) to which you are applying). This means that, like a cover letter, your teaching statement should be tailored for presentation to different audiences.

Research Statements

Some applications ask for a short research statement. This is your opportunity to propose a research plan and show how this builds on your current expertise and achievements. It forms the basis for discussions and your presentation if you are invited for interview.

Remember to:

  • Tailor each statement to the particular role you are applying for
  • Make sure there are clear links between your proposal and the work of the recruiting institution
  • Write about your research experience stating the aims, achievements, relevant techniques and your responsibilities for each project
  • Write as much (within the word limit) about your planned research and its contribution to the department, and to society more broadly
  • Invest time and ask for feedback from your supervisor/principal investigator or colleagues
Tips for JRF applications

Read the job description carefully to understand what is prioritised by the recruiting College or institution(s) beyond furthering your research.  If there are additional responsibilities such, as outreach, mentoring, expanding or fostering academic networks, you will need to provide evidence of your interest and experience in these areas, as well as statements about how you would fulfil these roles when in post.

Try to meet current JRF holders to gain further insight into what the role entails on a daily basis and what is expected by senior colleagues.

Show how your research contributes to, extends and/or maximises the impact of other work going on in the University. Then state why the JRF would enable you to further these in specific ways.

Give prominence to your publications (and those in progress), grant-writing experience and partnerships or work with people or organisations outside the university. Outline how you intend to participate in knowledge exchange and public engagement within your fellowship.

Our resources

Example Cover Letters

This information was last updated on 06 March 2017.
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Recent blogs about Cover Letters

Interested in a Career in Banking & Finance?

Blogged by Damilola Odimayo on May 24, 2017.

The undergraduate Finance Lab programme run by the Said Business School is a great opportunity to gain practical training, networking and recruitment opportunities in this sector. You don’t need a finance or economics background to get involved, just an interest in improving your financial, valuation and investment skills – the programme is open to all students in their second year of study onwards.

Interested? If so, why don’t you go along to the taster presentation on Tuesday 30th May from 18:00 – 19:30 at the Said Business School (Park End Street OX1 1HP)

Register online to attend.

Applications for the Finance Lab open on 30 May 2017, and admissions are on a rolling basis.

For more information on the Finance Lab, and details on how to apply, please visit the Finance Labs website.

For any questions please contact: OSFL@SBS.OX.AC.UK

Unlocked – Brand Manager roles for students

Blogged by Claire Chesworth on May 23, 2017.

Unlocked is a unique two-year leadership development programme aimed at training graduates to inject new ideas, insights and energy into the rehabilitation of UK prisons as prison officers. They are looking for enthusiastic students to work as Brand Managers and promote their graduate programme at Oxford University; you will need to be a full-time student from September 2017- March 2018.

Full details are on Unlocked’s website. Apply now!

Please check with your college regarding their policy on working during term-time.

 

Make a THIRD Micro-Internship Application!

Posted on behalf of The Internship Office. Blogged by Rachel Sene on May 23, 2017.

Already made two applications for a Micro-Internship? Still keen to gain experience in Week 9?

We have increased the number of applications permitted for students for Trinity Term Micro-Internships! You can now make a third application to one of our remaining Micro-Internships, even if you have already reached your application limit on CareerConnect. With placements still on offer including: award-winning education start-up: Whizz Education, Mental and Physical Health Consultancy: MAP, and a Civil Service Policy Game placement with OUCS, there’s still time to secure a one-of-a-kind placement for Week 9!

See instructions for making a third application below:

  1. Login to CareerConnect to view all remaining Micro-Internship opportunities.
  2. Write your 300 word personal statement and one page CV, and save in pdf format with the title of the vacancy you are applying to.
  3. Email both pdf documents to micro-internships@careers.ox.ac.uk before the deadline (specified on the micro-internship opportunity) with the subject heading: Micro-Internship Application “Vacancy Title”

A member of the Micro-Internship office will be in touch after the deadline to let you know the result of your application. Email: micro-internships@careers.ox.ac.uk for more information.

Please note: if you haven’t made two micro-internship applications yet and would like to apply, please submit you micro-internship application via CareerConnect as normal.

Insight Into Teaching – places still available

Blogged by Emily Game on May 23, 2017.

Insight into Teaching offers the opportunity to spend three days in a UK school with a full programme of lesson observation, involvement with school activities, and possibly the chance to try out some teaching! The programme lasts three days and takes place on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of 9th week this term.

Placements are currently available in secondary schools and further education colleges in both the state-maintained and independent school sectors. Most placements are in Oxford, or nearby towns that are easily accessible from Oxford. We also offer some placements in other parts of the UK.

The programme takes place on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of 9th week this term, 20 – 22 June 2017.

Placements still available:

  • Cambridge – Chemistry
  • London; Harrow, Feltham and Hillingdon – Range of Subjects
  • Oxfordshire Independent – Biology, Economics, Geography, English

How to apply

Available places are offered on a first-come, first-served basis up to the closing date of Wednesday of 6th week, 31 May 2017, so apply early to avoid disappointment. Apply via CareerConnect (select Internship Office & Skills Programmes, and search for Insight into Teaching TT17).

The programme is open to all students at Oxford University.

Find out more – including how to apply – on the Insight Into Teaching webpage.

Science in the European Commission – upcoming event

Blogged by Abby Evans on May 22, 2017.

What can a scientist do in the European Commission? (even after Brexit)

  • When: 28 June 2017, 13.00-14.00
    Where: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road, OX1 3QZ

Olga is a 4th year DPhil student in Chemistry. Last October she set out on an adventure – a five-month traineeship at the European Commission – with no previous experience of working in policy.

The traineeship turned out to be immensely enriching, and Olga is keen to share her experience as a scientist in Brussels and at one of the Commission’s Joint Research Centres in Italy with other science DPhil students and postdocs who might be interested in applying for the programme, as well as with anyone who is curious about how science is used in public policy.

The paid traineeships are a continuous scheme and do not require EU citizenship.

All are welcome to this informal session to find about more about opportunities for scientists in the European Commission. No registration needed, just come along.

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