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Cover Letters | The Careers Service Cover Letters – Oxford University Careers Service
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How to write cover letters

Example cover letter

A cover letter introduces and markets you effectively by complementing your CV. It tells your story by highlighting your relevant strengths and motivation for the person and organisation you are writing to, rather than listing all the things that can already be seen on your CV.

Always take the opportunity to submit a cover letter if you are given the opportunity.

The cover letter gives you scope to showcase what interests and drives you, and your enthusiasm for an organisation and the role. You can use it to align yourself with the organisation’s strengths, values and culture, and highlight in a targeted way your knowledge and strongest, most relevant skills for the position.

The content and style are up to you, but a logical and engaging structure is key. Below are some guidelines.

Style

Try to sound professional yet conversational, rather than wordy or too stiff and formal. Write in clear, concise English – take care not to drown the reader with your detail and avoid jargon they may not understand. The Plain English Campaign has some good guidance on improving your writing style.

Content

Layout

Set it out like a business letter. Brevity adds power, so do not exceed one A4 page in length. An exception is if the job has a person specification consisting of a detailed list of skills, and selection is based on applicants demonstrating in this letter that they have them all (i.e. there is no other application form).  In that case you can exceed one page – but remember that being concise and relevant is still important!

Introduction

Introduce yourself and explain why you are writing. If you are responding to an advertisement, state where you saw it. This tells the recruiter why they are reading the letter, and it gives them feedback on which of their advertising sources are working.  Introduce yourself: what are you studying, where and which year you are in, or when you will finish.

Why this job?

Explain why you are interested in the job and the organisation. Tailor the letter to the organisation and job description and make it implicit that you have not sent out multiple copies of the same letter to different employers. If you can, say something original about the organisation: don’t just repeat the text from their publicity material.

Draw on your research, especially what you have learnt from speaking with their staff (e.g. whilst meeting them at a fair or event, or during work shadowing/experience) as this will demonstrate an awareness and understanding of them that goes beyond the corporate website. Be specific about why the position is particularly attractive for you, and back this up with evidence from your past, or by linking this to your overall career plans, and what you find exciting about this sector.

Why you?

Explain why you are well-suited to the position. Refer to the relevant skills, experience and knowledge you have and match what you say to the requirements outlined in the job description. Tell your story and highlight key evidence so that you are building on, but not using exactly the same phrases contained in your CV. Make sure you read our webpage on demonstrating you fit the job criteria for more advice.

Even if you think that this position is out of reach, your job is to convince the recruiter that you are qualified enough and able to do the job.  Focus on your accomplishments and the transferable skills that are relevant to the role. State explicitly how you match the job criteria – don’t expect the person reading your letter to infer your skills or experiences for themselves.

Support your claims by referring to examples that are already detailed in your CV. You can make a stronger, more credible case by linking different experiences that highlight similar skills or competences. For example:

  • You first demonstrated your organisational skills by creating (an event) at school, and you  have developed them further by raising (£xx) at last year’s fundraiser and, most recently, by leading (another event) for your Society attended by (number) of people.
  • The role (applied for) would allow you to use your passion for helping others, which has driven your success as College Welfare Officer and the personal sense of achievement gained from working as a peer counsellor.

Conclusion

Reiterate your desire to join the organisation and end on a ‘look forward to hearing from you’ statement, followed by ‘Yours sincerely’ if writing to a named individual, and ‘Yours faithfully’ if you have not been able to find a named contact. Type your name, but also don’t forget to sign the letter if you are printing it out.

Top tips

  • Write to a named person if you possibly can – rather than Dear Sir/Madam.
  • Check your spelling and get someone else to read it over.
  • Check that it says clearly what you want it to say.  Are there any sections that are hard to read or follow? If yes, try to simplify the language, use shorter sentences or take out that section completely.
  • Make the letter different each time. If you insert another company name, does the letter still read the same? If so, try to differentiate each letter more!
  • Don’t start every sentence with “I”.
  • Give evidence for all your claims.
  • Be enthusiastic and interested.
  • Don’t repeat your whole CV.
  • A Careers Adviser at the Careers Service can give you feedback on the content and structure of your cover letter and CV, and advise you on how best to target particular sectors – write one first and bring it to us for feedback.
Academic cover letters and statements

Academic Cover Letters

Academic cover letters vary in length, purpose, content and tone. Each job application requires a new, distinct letter. For applications that require additional research or teaching statements, there is no point repeating these points in a cover letter – here, one page is enough. Other applications ask for a CV and a cover letter only, in which case the letter will need to be longer and require more detail.

In all cases:

  • 2 pages is the maximum: show that you can prioritise according to what they are looking for
  • Your letter is a piece of academic writing – you need a strong argument and empirical evidence
  • Write for the non-expert to prove that you can communicate well
  • Make sure you sound confident by using a tone that is collegial (rather than like a junior talking to a senior)
  • Demonstrate your insight into what the recruiting department is doing in areas of research and teaching, and say what you would bring to these areas from your work thus far

Give quantifiable evidence of teaching, research and funding success where possible

Teaching Statements

What is a Teaching Statement and Why Do You Need One?

When making an academic job application, you may be asked for a teaching statement (sometimes referred to as a ‘philosophy of teaching statement’). These statements may also be requested of candidates for grant applications or teaching awards.

A teaching statement is a narrative that describes:

  • How you teach.
  • Why you teach the way you do.
  • How you know if you are an effective teacher, and how you know that your students are learning.

The rationale behind a teaching statement is to:

  • Demonstrate that you have been reflective and purposeful about your teaching. This means showing an understanding of the teaching process and your experience of this.
  • Communicate your goals as an instructor, and your corresponding actions in the laboratory, classroom, or other teaching setting.

Format and style of a Teaching Statement

There is no required content or format for a teaching statement, because they are personal in nature, but they are generally 1-2 pages, and written in first person. The statement will include teaching strategies and methods to help readers ‘see’ you in a lab, lecture hall, or other teaching setting. The teaching statement is, in essence, a writing sample, and should be written with the audience in mind (i.e. the search committee for the institution(s) to which you are applying). This means that, like a cover letter, your teaching statement should be tailored for presentation to different audiences.

Research Statements

Some applications ask for a short research statement. This is your opportunity to propose a research plan and show how this builds on your current expertise and achievements. It forms the basis for discussions and your presentation if you are invited for interview.

Remember to:

  • Tailor each statement to the particular role you are applying for
  • Make sure there are clear links between your proposal and the work of the recruiting institution
  • Write about your research experience stating the aims, achievements, relevant techniques and your responsibilities for each project
  • Write as much (within the word limit) about your planned research and its contribution to the department, and to society more broadly
  • Invest time and ask for feedback from your supervisor/principal investigator or colleagues
Tips for JRF applications

Read the job description carefully to understand what is prioritised by the recruiting College or institution(s) beyond furthering your research.  If there are additional responsibilities such, as outreach, mentoring, expanding or fostering academic networks, you will need to provide evidence of your interest and experience in these areas, as well as statements about how you would fulfil these roles when in post.

Try to meet current JRF holders to gain further insight into what the role entails on a daily basis and what is expected by senior colleagues.

Show how your research contributes to, extends and/or maximises the impact of other work going on in the University. Then state why the JRF would enable you to further these in specific ways.

Give prominence to your publications (and those in progress), grant-writing experience and partnerships or work with people or organisations outside the university. Outline how you intend to participate in knowledge exchange and public engagement within your fellowship.

Our resources

Example Cover Letters

This information was last updated on 06 March 2017.
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Recent blogs about Cover Letters

New internships in Laos

Blogged by Caroline Thurston on March 27, 2017.

The Internship Office is now advertising its first ever internships in Laos (the Laos People’s Democratic Republic). The two opportunities are available with Phongsavanh Bank, the first commercial private bank to be established in socialist-governed Laos.

Positions available:

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  2. New Product Strategy Planner – designing and conducting a feasibility study; designing a market entry strategy for a leasing scheme which offers ‘micro-loans’ for high-value personal goods such as cars

Both positions offer unique opportunities to gain professional, high-level experience in the banking sector in SE Asia, and to explore a fascinating and little-known country at a time of unprecedented growth and change.

The compensation package for both positions includes a generous monthly stipend, free accommodation, and return travel from the UK.

See CareerConnect for full details of both positions. If, having read this information, you have further queries, please contact the Internship Office Manager: caroline.thurston@careers.ox.ac.uk.

The OX– Postcode Fair 2017

Blogged by John Gilbert on March 27, 2017.
  • When: Thursday 4 May, Exhibitors from 15.00-18.00
  • Where: The Careers Service (56 Banbury Road, OX2 6PA)

Explore local opportunities…

Looking to stay in Oxford after you graduate, or over the summer? This fair – for students at Oxford University and Oxford Brookes – brings together employers from across Oxfordshire, all with vacancies for full-time jobs or internships!

… in a wide range of sectors

Attending organisations are drawn from many different industries, reflecting the array of opportunities on offer around Oxford – including Education, Computing, Retail, Finance, Health & Social Care, Science, Not-for-Profits and more…

Meet 30 employers

Full details of employers attending will be in the booklet released online one week before the fair. Already confirmed are:

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IG Charity Hackathon: Applications open now

Posted on behalf of IG and Teens Unite. Blogged by Hugh Nicholson-Lailey on March 24, 2017.
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  • When: Saturday 22 April, 10.00-20.00

Make a difference through technology

Do you have experience in IT development? This is a chance for you to show off your programming skills and challenge yourself – while helping a charity to solve a real-life problem.

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Sign up in a team of 3-5 and join IG’s charity hack in aid of Teens Unite, at our headquarters in the City of London. Applications will be open until Friday 14 April, and places will be allocated on a first-come-first- served basis. Please apply for 1 ticket per team at IG Charity Hackathon

 

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Use our 3D Printer for Free!

Blogged by Karan Karasinska on March 24, 2017.
  • See our 3D printing page for full information!
  • You can send us a 3D file from one of the many collections of 3D designs that are available to download from online websites such as Thingiverse.
  • Or, check out the ‘Popular’ tab: 3D + Animation at Lynda to find out how you can build your own 3D design models.
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Graduate Entrepreneur Visa Endorsement – apply now!

Posted on behalf of Tim Collins. Blogged by Timothy Collins on March 22, 2017.

If you have an idea for a business, have a venture currently in development, or are piloting a new concept, you may be eligible to apply for our endorsement under the Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) visa scheme, which allows non-EEA nationals who are graduates or post-doctoral researchers to reside in the UK in order to develop their business.

Previously endorsed businesses have included:

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  • Technology start-ups
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  • Energy research

The University of Oxford can endorse up to thirty applicants per year. Calls for applications are held four times a year: once in each term, and once during the Long Vacation. The next deadline for applications is Monday 12 June 2017 at 12 noon. Applications are now open, and you must apply via Symplicity (for Said Business School students) or CareerConnect (for all other students/alumni) using the following vacancy IDs:

  • for Students: CareerConnect opportunity ID 25400
  • for Alumni: CareerConnect opportunity ID 25392

You can find more information and details of how to apply on our visa page or on CareerConnect. Alternatively you can email timothy.collins@careers.ox.ac.uk.

All applications must be submitted through CareerConnect or emailed to timothy.collins@careers.ox.ac.uk by Monday 12 June 2017 at 12 noon.

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