Seen these icons?

If we have events, jobs or news that are relevant to the page topic, you can access them by clicking on icons next to the print button.

Human Resources | Oxford University Careers Service Human Resources | Oxford University Careers Service
Oxford logo
About this sector

Human Resources (HR) is at the centre of business performance with HR professionals driving decisions that enable their organisations to perform at their best. HR professionals aim to make the most effective use of the people within an organisation. Given that anyone working in an HR department will deal with a wide range of people on a day-to-day basis, an approachable, calm and professional manner is key.

Recruitment is a major function within HR and roles in this area may be based either in-house (managing the recruitment needs of an organisation) or in a consultancy (handling recruitment for a range of different clients). Executive recruitment consultancies (headhunters) typically operate in specialist areas sourcing candidates for senior appointments. They often approach individuals directly rather than advertising openly.

Organisations are increasingly aware of the value and importance of HR functions and almost every organisation now has HR staff in some capacity. The professional association for HR/Personnel specialists and generalists in the UK is the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) and its current membership stands at over 135,000. Although most graduate opportunities are within large commercial organisations with large HR teams or in the large public sector employers, opportunities exist in organisations of all sizes.

Types of job

HR jobs

  • Generalist HR assistants, officers, managers and directors
  • Training and development officers, managers and directors
  • Compensation and benefits specialists
  • Employee relations specialists
  • Performance managers
  • Health and safety managers
  • Resource planners
  • HR Consultant

Recruitment jobs

  • Recruiters – including graduate recruiters
  • Recruitment consultants
  • Headhunters


Generalist HR officers will be involved in some, or all, of the following: strategic resource planning, recruitment and selection, training, pay and benefits and related administration, employment contracts, handling disciplinary and grievance cases, advising management and staff on policies and procedures, creating new performance management policies, reporting on HR issues, negotiating with trade unions/staff associations or councils and much more.

Generalist HR work involves a constant change in the type of interaction you have with employees. One minute you may be supporting the business to hire new talent and the next you may be supporting a member of staff who has raised a grievance against their manager. Some HR professionals will work across the whole range of areas and others may specialise. In small organisations, where there may be only one or two HR representatives, it is more likely that you will be required to cover all areas.


Recruitment is a specialist area of HR. You can work as a recruiter within an organisation (often either focusing on graduate or experienced hire recruitment) or as recruitment consultant or headhunter. Large organisations, such as law firms, banks, Fast Moving Consumer Goods(FMCG) and retail companies, will often have dedicated internal recruitment teams responsible for managing the recruitment process from application through to the assessment process and making offers. The key skills for such roles are:

  • very strong interpersonal skills – especially the ability to work with colleagues  at all levels within the firm including very senior staff
  • strong attention to detail
  • the ability to multi-task effectively

Due to the high volume of recruitment in some organisations the recruitment teams may also engage the services of recruitment consultancies or headhunters to help find candidates, especially those at the senior level or with specific expertise.

Recruitment consultants and headhunters work with their clients (companies and organisation of various sizes) seeking to match prospective employees to clients’ vacancies. Recruitment consultancies often specialise in particular employment sectors and invariably, they aim to make as much commission as possible by successfully placing the individuals who register with them. The ability to build good relationships with employers is key skill to have in this sector.

This is a fast moving environment, riding high or low depending on labour market conditions; the availability of entry-level positions for graduates will also depend on the labour market. In contrast, Headhunters, actively search and approach (“headhunt”) fewer specialist or senior staff and rely  more heavily on strong networks of contacts in the sectors concerned, approaching targeted individuals on behalf of prospective employers.


Salaries vary considerably depending upon location, specialism, sector and level of seniority. Basic salary levels in London range from c. £23,000 for entry-level HR/recruitment positions to upwards of £100,000 for HR directors in professional services firms (Hudson HR Salary & Employment Insights 2014). Recruiters working in agencies tend to earn a basic salary and then have an element of commission and/or bonuses on top.

Entry points

A large number and range of organisations recruit for HR vacancies. High Flyers data shows that 37% of leading UK employers are recruiting for positions in HR in 2015. Starting positions are often on formal graduate training schemes; a broad range of organisations from public sector (NHS, Bank of England and Civil Service Fast Stream) to large corporations (Sky, British Airways, Nestle, Unilever, Centrica, Barclays, M&S, Jaguar Land Rover) run specialised HR graduate programmes.

If you are not joining a graduate training programme, some organisations prefer to take entrants who have achieved the CIPD practitioner-level qualification. Study can be undertaken on a full or part-time basis; more information can be found on the CIPD website. Many organisations who hire graduates onto HR graduate programmes will provide support to take this qualification whilst working. So before enrolling on the course it can be helpful to check whether qualification is necessary for the roles you are applying for and/or if your employer can support/sponsor your studies.

Recruitment consultancies regularly recruit new graduates, sometimes onto their own training schemes such as, Reed and Hays Recruitment. Headhunters sometimes look for researchers to assist more senior staff – an increasing area of opportunity for graduates. Alternatively another good place to start is as an administrator in an HR department or in a Personnel Assistant post. The CIPD qualification is less commonly requested for entry level positions in recruitment.

Whichever route you take, you can expect to be given as much responsibility as you can handle fairly quickly.

Postgraduate Qualifications

Unless you have a relevant postgraduate qualification in HR Management that provides exemptions from all or part of the CIPD Practitioner-level qualification or have fully or partly achieved the CIPD Practitioner-level qualification, postgraduate qualifications are unlikely to set you apart from undergraduates who are applying. However, it will be worth examining closely how your postgraduate qualification helps you to provide evidence that you meet the job requirements, as this may give you leverage when it comes to agreeing a salary.

Skills & experience

Skills needed

A wide range of skills are required for these business-focused roles. No specific degree discipline is required, although psychology, law or business related studies are useful. The  competencies for HR programmes within large organisations are likely to reflect the general graduate competencies at that organisation, however some key skills that may be required include:

  • Resilience, with an ability to handle pressure
  • An analytical, often procedural, approach
  • An ability to form good working relationships and apply effective interpersonal skills when dealing with people of differing levels of seniority
  • A good level of business/commercial awareness
  • Well-organised, flexible and numerate
  • Ability to persuade and negotiate, influence, listen and question
  • Excellent oral communication skills and have the ability to switch from one type of situation to another rapidly, adapting communication styles as necessary
  • Integrity and approachability, as managers and staff must feel able to discuss sensitive and confidential issues with you

Getting experience

HR experience is not essential but is often a distinct advantage. Large multi-national organisations in a broad range of sectors offer HR internships such as Nestle, Lloyds TSB, EDF Energy, J.P.Morgan, P&G and Goldman Sachs. Some work placement opportunities are also advertised on on our website.

In the case of smaller organisations, you may need to adopt a ‘speculative’ approach, sending your CV and cover letter to potential employers. Don’t wait for advertisements to appear, think about your network of contacts and how they could help you. Any form of business experience is useful, so think laterally.

There is often confusion about whether you should be paid to do an internship or work experience. It will depend on your arrangement with the employer and also the status of the employer. To find out if you are entitled to be paid when undertaking work experience or an internship, visit the Government’s webpages on the National Minimum Wage.

Getting a job

Vacancies are advertised on the individual organisation websites, as well as in journals and newspapers. Larger organisations usually hire for their HR Graduate programmes during the “Milkround” (typically from September to December each year), so check the websites of the firms you are interested in early, to confirm the dates and deadlines. Vacancies may appear under other sectors as well as HR, e.g. Human Capital Management, General Management, Administration, or the sector of the organisations main business, for example an HR vacancy at a bank may well come under the finance sector. Recruitment consultancies often advertise vacancies throughout the year.

Speak to HR professionals at all kinds of recruitment fairs and employer presentations and build your network of useful contacts. Look for vacancies at more junior levels within HR that will allow you to work your way up. Target HR consultancies that regularly advertise. Look also in the main professional journals Personnel Today and People Management.

Equality & positive action

A number of major graduate recruiters have policies and processes that are proactive in recruiting graduates from diverse backgrounds. To find out the policies and attitudes of employers that you are interested in, explore their equality and diversity policies and see if they offer ‘Guaranteed Interview Schemes’ (for disabled applicants) or are recognised for their policy by such indicators as ‘Mindful Employer’ or as a ‘Stonewall’s Diversity Champion’.
The UK law protects you from discrimination due to your age, gender, race, religion or beliefs, disability or sexual orientation. For further information on the Equality Act and to find out where and how you are protected, and what to do if you feel you have been discriminated against, visit the Government’s webpages on discrimination.

External resources


Sector vacancies

  • Personnel Today – An excellent source of information on HR careers.
  • Changeboard – Contains lots of sector vacancies and careers information

News, institutes & organisations

This information was last updated on 09 November 2015.
Loading... Please wait
Recent blogs about Human Resources

Advertising and PR: Recommended Reading

Blogged by Julia Hilton on November 24, 2015.

Miles Young, CEO of Ogilvy & Mather, gave the headline talk at the 2015 Oxford Arts, Media and Marketing Fair. The talk covered how the landscape is changing in the advertising world and what companies are really looking for from the next generation of applicants in this digital world. The good news is that being immersed in digital media already makes you an expert, it’s not all about swotting up on technical language and programming, recruiters still want to see bright, creative minds and people who can work with clients and manage projects.

So how can you really prepare for making competitive applications in advertising and how can you impress at interview? Gain some commercial insight! Not just by building your relevant experience via extra-curricular pursuits and work experience, but via books. GET READING. Here’s some key suggestions from Miles for careers in advertising and PR…

Advertising books to read

  1. Alfredo Marcantonio,”Well-written and red”
  1. Alan Fletcher, “The art of looking sideways”
  2. Paul Arden, “It’s not how good you are, it’s how good you want to be”
  3. Bob Gill, “Graphic design as a second language”
  4. Bob Levenson,”Bill Bernbach’s Book”
  5. Luke Sullivan, “Hey Mr Whipple, squeeze this”
  6. Beryl McAlhone & David Stuart, “A smile in the mind”
  7. James Webb Young, “A technique for producing ideas”
  8. Jonas Ridderstrale + Kjeli Nordstrom, “Funky Business”
  9. “The Art Direction Book” published by D&AD
  10. “The Copy Book” published by D&AD
  11. “The Movie Book” published by Phaidon
  12. Cutting Edge Advertising by Jim Aitchison
  13. “Truth, Lies and Advertising: The Art of Account Planning” by Jon Steele
  14. “Good Thinking: A Guide to Qualitative Research” by Wendy Gordon
  15. “How to Plan advertising” by The APG (Account Planning Group)


PR Reading List

  1. “The Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR” by Al Ries
  2. “The handbook of Strategic Public Relations” by Clarke Caywood
  3. “The 18 Immutable Laws of Corporate Reputation” by Ronald Alsop
  4. Value-Added Public Relations: The Secret Weapon of Integrated Marketing, Thomas L Harris
  5. Where The Truth Lies: Trust and Morality in PR and Journalism, Hobsbawm, J (2006)


Publications to Read Regularly:

  • Advertising Age
  • Adweek
  • Campaign ‐ The British advertising news source

Competition Time: The Future We Deserve

Blogged by Hugh Nicholson-Lailey on November 24, 2015.

Can you imagine the shape of public services in five years, and communicate your vision for how design and technology will merge to deliver new and better services? SapientNitro are offering you the chance to win a trip to Helsinki next year to present your idea at next year’s Interaction Awards Final.

Creative Agency, SapientNitro, invite submissions from individuals or teams of two on the theme of ‘The Future We Deserve’ by 20th December. Full details are included in the IxDA Student design Challenge 2016 flyer.

SapientNitro is a division of Sapienta marketing and consulting company that provides business, marketing, and technology services to clients. Its capabilities include integrated marketing and creative services, web and interactive development, traditional advertising, media planning and buying, strategic planning and marketing analytics, multi-channel commerce strategy and solutions including focus on mobile, and content and asset management strategies and solutions.

Win an Internship at The Bank of England

Posted on behalf of The Bank of England. Blogged by Polly Metcalfe on November 24, 2015.

There’s a lot of buzz around blockchain. It’s a technology that allows people who don’t know each other to trust a shared record of events. And its potential won’t just impact financial services. Many believe that blockchain could track and verify almost any digital record.

  • So how would you use it?
  • What business would you apply it to?
  • What new product would you create?

Whatever your idea, pitch it to The Bank of England and you could win a paid internship or a place at their graduate assessment centre. For more inofmration see The Bank of England website.

Canal+ Group – Opportunities to Work in Media

Posted on behalf of Canal+ Group. Blogged by Julia Hilton on November 24, 2015.

Canal+ Group is keen to pursue conversations they had with students at the recent Arts, Media and Marketing Fair. They are also happy to hear from students and recent alumni who weren’t able to meet with them during the day but who are interested in potential opportunities at their company.

All you need to do is take 4 steps:

  • 1st step: visit the Canal+ Group website (remember most of the website is in French)
  • 2nd step: select a minimum of 5 to a maximum of 10 current vacancies (job titles only) that you would potentially be interested in the near future (do not take into account the date of the vacancy)
  • 3rd step: inform Canal+ Group as from which date and for how long you would be available.
  • 4th step: include your selected vacancies, your availability and attach your CV in an email to before the  30th of November 2015.

Things to keep in mind:

  • To start they will focus on French speakers
  • They will come back to the non-French speakers if they have a suitable opportunity to offer
  • The more precise you are the easier it will be to identify the best opportunity for you
  • Next step: will be a skype interview with selected candidates with an HR professional


In order to give you a taste of the Canal + Group see the trailer of “VERSAILLES” their latest “création originale”.

This page displays current related blog posts. If none display, you can still stay up-to-date with our newsletter sent regularly to all Oxford students.

Older posts can be found in our archive of past blogs.