Seen these icons?

If we have events, jobs or news that are relevant to the page topic, you can access them by clicking on icons next to the print button.

International Law | Oxford University Careers Service International Law | Oxford University Careers Service
Oxford logo
About this sector

International Law is broad and diverse: this briefing aims to give an overview of the different areas of work, jobs, skills and ways to start to gain experience. We take as a principle that ‘international law’ refers to either public or private international law as areas of practice: this briefing does not cover being a qualified lawyer overseas.

Public international law

Traditionally, this deals with the law governing relations between nations, although since the rise of human rights acts now also concerns how states treat their own citizens.  This area includes:

  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Environmental Law
  • International Trade Law
  • International Boundary Disputes
  • Law of the Sea
  • International Criminal Law
  • Law of Armed Conflicts

Employers include:

  • National governments (e.g. the Government Legal Service)
  • Intergovernmental organisations (e.g. United Nations, European Union, Council of Europe),
  • International Criminal Tribunals and Courts
  • NGOs (e.g. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, JUSTICE, Friends of the Earth)
  • Private law firms with a public international law practice area. A good list can be found at Chambers’ top ranked firms
  • Armed Services
  • Academia

Private international law / International business law

Traditionally, this deals with the legal issues which arise in cross-border transactions between individuals, corporations and organisations (sometimes this is referred to as ‘conflict of laws’).  This area includes:

  • Taxation, Financial Securities and Banking Law
  • Business Arbitration, Trade Transactions, Corporate Governance and Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A)
  • Intellectual Property and Competition Law
  • International Arbitration

To find potential employers, search for firms with relevant practice areas (e.g. ‘M&A’ or ‘International Arbitration’) on the Chambers & Partners website.

Public / Private divide?

In an increasingly globalised world, the division between public and private international law is increasingly blurred.  Top corporate law firms describe their public international law practices as serving the relationship between nation states and private corporations (for example in investor-state dispute or advisory work). Lawyers increasingly take their skills with them as they move between public and private areas of work, with many training in the private sector at the start of their career.

Types of job


Researching, publishing and teaching, having studied higher degrees (usually a doctorate) in an international law specialism.


A practicing solicitor/barrister (or attorney outside of the UK) working in relevant practice areas to international law.

Paralegal / Legal assistant

Supporting lawyers in their work, such as drafting documents and collecting, analysing and summarising information. Could go on to study as a Chartered Legal Executive to become a ‘fee earner’, or pursue qualification as solicitor/barrister.

Project officer / assistant

Working within an organisation with a link with international law, often an NGO or intergovernmental body.  Providing administrative, project management or field work support to a project which relates to the field, not working in a legal capacity. Projects could range from awareness campaigns to research work, to direct support for beneficiaries (e.g. refugees).

Support roles

Every organisation, whatever their cause or values, has a range of support roles, which keeps everything working smoothly: from finance, to marketing, to HR, to IT, to senior management.  Direct-entry roles exist within most organisations to support these departments.


Providing similar support roles to a legal assistant in some cases, but usually also face-to-face advice for clients (e.g. prisoners, immigrants and asylum seekers).

Policy advisor / analyst

Working in an organisation with a remit for advocacy – seeking to question, analyse and propose solutions to policy and political agendas.

Entry points

There is no one route in to a career in international law, and it’s worth remembering that there are roles for those who are not qualified lawyers too, particularly in supporting functions within the same employer, which can be more instantly attainable.

Requirements for entry

To work as a public international lawyer you will usually need:

  1. Qualification as a lawyer in a legal jurisdiction
  2. Relevant language skills
  3. Relevant international experience (e.g. an overseas seat as part of a training contract, YPP programme,a traineeship with an intergovernmental body and possibly more experience too.)

A Masters-level law degree (e.g. LLM, BCL or MJur) in a relevant area can be helpful, particularly for academic or EU roles, but this can be substituted for by relevant professional experience for those that move later into these areas.

To work as a private international lawyer you will usually need:

  1. Qualification as a lawyer in a legal jurisdiction
  2. Relevant experience with an international practice area (e.g. relevant seats during your training contract)
  3. Relevant language skills, if required.

Qualifying as a lawyer

Full details are available within our advice for Solicitor or Barrister routes, but it’s worth pursuing international law options where you can: if you’re taking a law undergraduate degree at Oxford, the final year option of public international law, or other related topics such as International Trade, European Human Rights Law, EU Law would be advised. If you don’t have a legal undergraduate degree, research your GDL course providers to see which allow you to take international law options in addition to the compulsory subjects. If you don’t have an undergraduate degree, a masters degree in law is likely to be particularly beneficial when competing against those educated in lengthier legal training.

Your LPC (solicitors) or BPTC (barristers) is the next step in your training, followed by a training contract (solicitors) or pupillage (barristers).  This stage of qualifying is unlikely to be as highly specialised around your interests, as very few chambers take on only human rights cases, and you will be required to work in different practice areas for your training contract.  This provides a solid base in law, which can provide a good ‘fall back’ option while looking for international law roles more suited to your interests, post qualification. However, it also means that an interest in the law itself, not just the cause, is essential. Remember, if working on other areas of law isn’t something that will motivate you, it might be worth considering working in the field, but not as a lawyer (look for vacancies in project support, communications, policy, and research to explore other ideas).

LLM or equivalent

A LLM degree (or equivalent legal Masters-level course) is sometimes sought for public international law roles. However, it’s worth remembering that those who wish to work as lawyers will usually pursue their initial legal qualification and work to develop excellence in their professional work first, and then might choose to return for LLM study later in their career.  This allows more time to develop as a professional and gain experiences which will enhance your learning, and crystallise professional interests which could inform the choice of masters course itself.   If you choose to take an LLM, it worth researching funding options and scholarships available, for example the Hauser Scholars Programme provides funding for 10-14 students to undertake legal masters courses (and also 2 research scholars) at New York University School of Law.

Skills & experience

Skills needed

Skills will vary depending on the exact job, but common attributes which are sought in job postings include:

  • Strong professional skills, such as research, drafting, advocacy.
  • Flexibility and adaptability (either to work in a firm which also serves other practice areas, or, in a different role, to work in less hospitable regions)
  • Strong cultural awareness to function within a multi-national environment
  • Language skills are an asset, particularly for intergovernmental organisations who often require proficiency in their working languages, e.g. French and English for the UN

Getting experience

This section illustrates some potential sources of internships and work experience. Vacation schemes and mini pupillages are also available in UK law firms and chambers, and these are not listed here.

  • Also see our related information for work experience advice for other sectors, e.g. Solicitors, Barristers, International Organisations, Charities and Government and Public Administration.
  • Remember to save your search for work experience and internships on CareerConnect to receive email alerts (you might also want to explore the archive too).

Intergovernmental organisations

Private international law

  • Mountbatten – One year’s paid experience and study in New York/London aimed at fostering cross-cultural business understanding. Not law specific.

Professional associations

Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs)

Academic & research institutions

Local voluntary work in Oxford

Funding for work experience

There is often confusion about whether you should be paid to do an internship or work experience. It will depend on your arrangement with the employer as well as on the status of the employer. To find out if you are entitled to be paid when undertaking work experience or an internship, visit the UK Government: National Minimum Wage webpages.

Many internships available within public international law are unpaid, offered as they are by charities or public bodies with limited funds.  Although it may not be possible to take every opportunity, the following represent ways in which previous students have accessed unpaid internships:

  • Oxford Pro Bono Public: Internship – up to £2000, available to enrolled Oxford graduate students (usually in Law).
  • ASIL: Helton Fellowship Program – up to $2000 for field work or research on issues around international law, human rights, humanitarian affairs etc. In previous years applications opening in October, but only the first 50 were reviewed. Limited to current law student or recent law graduates.
  • HRLA: Bursaries   – up to c.£1000 for work related to human rights law for those who would otherwise lack financial means to do it.
  • ANZSIL: Internship  –  up to A$2,000 for Australian or New Zealand citizens taking unpaid internships in international organisations or NGOs
  • Enter essay competitions (few competitions, but sizeable prize money)
    • The Times Law Award
    • Graham Turnbull Essay Competition
    • Bar Council Law Reform Essay Competition
    • Access to Justice Student Competition
    • Junior Lawyers’ Division Essay Competition (Law Society)
    • UKELA (UK Environmental Law Association) Andrew Lees Essay Prize
    • Marion Simmons QC Essay Competition
    • Commonwealth Law Student Essay Competition
  • It may be worth contacting regional alumni offices for the country or region you wish to work in, or perhaps speak to your college alumni office, many are happy to circulate requests for advice which could lead to low-cost accommodation solutions.


Funding internships & study

  • The Oxford Pro Bono Publico Internship programme – 5-10 x £500 awards for graduates seeking non paid or poorly paid internships in public sector organisations You can see a list of internship ideas and read about where previous interns have worked . Applications are usually made in Hilary term.
  • The Arthur C Helton Fellowship programme. Through this programme the American Society of International Law provides financial assistance to approximately 10 law students and young professionals per year to pursue fieldwork and research on significant issues involving international law, human rights, humanitarian affairs and related areas.  Applicants can be of any nationality but you must be a current law student or have graduated from law school (UG or PG) no earlier than December 2013. This is an annual award for those wishing to undertake work experience between April-September. Only the first 50 completed applications are considered, and the application normally opens in October.
  • The Human Rights Lawyers Association offers bursaries to help people through unpaid volunteering roles and internships.  Applications will re-open in Spring 2016.
  • The Australian and New Zealand Society of International Law (ANZSIL) provide financial support for people undertaking unpaid internships in international organisations or NGOs. You must be an Australian or New Zealand citizen or permanent resident.
  • Hauser Scholars Programme provides funding for 10-14 students to undertake legal masters courses (and also 2 research scholars) at New York University School of Law.
  • Future Legal Mind Award offers the opportunity to win £5,000 towards study costs and a work experience placement at Colemans-ctts.
  • Check with the Embassies, High Commissions and businesses in the regions that you are going to for further possible sources.
  • The Inns of Court provide funding for their barristers to undertake internships during or just after the pupillage year. See the Inns’ websites for more details.
  • Consider entering essay competitions – see above section on funding work experience.
  • Check with your college as you may be able to apply for travel grants or other financial aid for work experience.


Our information on Funding Postgraduate Study in the UK and Funding Postgraduate Study in the USA will also be useful in searching for funding opportunities for further study.

Getting a job

There’s no ‘one way’ to work in international law, and so you might like to start by reading about the experiences of those who have already found employment within the field. Consider which profiles align most closely with your interests and ambitions, and what you could learn from their routes in:


Advertised roles

  • Check websites for the organisations mentioned throughout this overview regularly – their vacancies may be picked up by websites listed under ‘External Resources’, but many will only actively place opportunities on their own pages.
  • Sign up for email alerts from vacancy websites, including our own CareerConnect.
  • Be aware that some opportunities (such as the YPP at the United Nations) function as ‘competitions’ – different roles and different nationalities are welcomed each time the competition window opens, and those that are successful are placed on a list from which departments can offer employment. Most are employed within a year or so, but being successful in the competition is no guarantee of employment, and from application to contract is rarely a speedy process!
  • As a general rule, ‘traineeships’ are paid work – e.g. the European Court of Human Rights: Assistant Lawyers Scheme, and ‘fellowships’ are often used to describe internships designed for graduates/postgraduates who have completed their studies: these may be paid or unpaid.

Unadvertised roles

  • Build your network of contacts and your knowledge of topical issues through joining student associations and clubs with an international law focus such as ELSA or Young Legal Aid Lawyers. Take part in mooting events.  Not all jobs in this sector will be advertised, so talking with your tutors and practitioners can help you to find out about both full time and internship positions. As your career develops, the ability to network successfully will be hugely important.
  • It is also often possible to make speculative approaches for work experience – decide which geographical area you would like to work in and the sort of work you are keen on and then contact the relevant organisations that operate there.

Equality & positive action

A number of major graduate recruiters have policies and processes that are proactive in recruiting graduates from diverse backgrounds. To find out the policies and attitudes of employers that you are interested in, explore their equality and diversity policies and see if they offer ‘Guaranteed Interview Schemes’ (for disabled applicants) or are recognised for their policy by such indicators as ‘Mindful Employer’ or as a ‘Stonewall’s Diversity Champion’.

The UK law protects you from discrimination due to your age, gender, race, religion or beliefs, disability or sexual orientation. For further information on the Equality Act and to find out where and how you are protected, as well as what you need to do if you feel you have been discriminated against, visit the Government’s webpages on discrimination.

External Resources

Directories of firms & organisations

  • Oxford Faculty of Law: Pro Bono Publico – A useful list of public law bodies and organisations.
  • Chambers and Partners – Research firms and rankings within preferred practice areas (e.g. ‘public international law’)
  • Legal 500 – Research firms within preferred practice areas (e.g. ‘civil liberties and human rights’ – under ‘public law’)
  • HG: Practice Areas – A useful summary of key firms and other organisations around 260 practice areas

Sector vacancies

Please see the sites mentioned in the work experience list of this briefing and details of pupillages and training contracts in the Law Society’s “Training Contract and Pupillage Handbook”. Free copies of this are available at the Law Fair and in the Careers Service.
General legal job boards (such as Legal Week, The Lawyer, Law Society Gazette Jobs) do occasionally carry public international roles, but they’re rare here. It’s more common to see roles listed directly on organisation websites. Use the organisations and associations mentioned here to find post-qualification and other supporting roles.

  • EuroBrussels – Covers vacancies in EU institutions and law firms operating in Brussels, as well as NGOs, political organisations and think tanks.
  • EPSO – Competitions for permanent roles and recruitment for temporary posts within the EU
  • Government Legal Service
  • W4MP – Work for an MP, a job site for those with an interest in the policy and government roles
  • Idealist – Global job site, particularly strong for NGO roles
  • Devex: Jobs and Devnet Jobs – search by keyword for law-related vacancies within the development field
  • Guardian: Jobs – Occasional vacancies for law/rights related work

Professional associations

This information was last updated on 08 October 2015.
Loading... Please wait
Recent blogs about International Law

Meet Shell one-to-one

Posted on behalf of Shell. Blogged by Employer Relations Team on October 9, 2015.

Shell have immediate vacancies available in HR, Finance and IT for motivated graduates to join the Shell Graduate Programme. We will be at The Careers Service on Tuesday 27th October, for one-to-one appointments with students.

At Shell, we have around 94,000 people operating in more than 70 countries, working together to help meet the world’s growing demand for energy. As we endeavour to be one of the most innovative companies in the world, we’re looking for remarkable graduates to join us on this exciting journey of discovery, pushing boundaries.

On the Shell Graduate Programme you’ll be able to collaborate with some of the best minds in your field as you help to pioneer new ideas aimed at meeting future energy demands in ways that are economically, environmentally and socially responsible. As you build your own diverse network of talented individuals, you’ll be inspired to make discoveries that could have a real impact on the future.

Discover the benefits of working with a global team as you embark on an industry-leading development programme tailored to your aspirations and experience. With the space and flexibility to develop your own strengths, areas of interest and working style you’ll also have the chance to develop your leadership skills to help you reach your potential.

If you are interested in a career in HR, Finance or IT and would like the opportunity to speak with a Shell professional on a one to one basis regarding your CV, application to the Shell Graduate Programme or have a more general enquiry relating to working at Shell and Graduate opportunities within the company then please book an appointment.

We are searching for remarkable Graduates to join our team.

Shell is an equal opportunities employer.

How to book an appointment

Appointments are available one week before the event. To make an appointment you will need to book your time slot through CareerConnect. Login to CareerConnect and search for “Recruiter in Residence – Shell” under events; click on ‘Book Now’, and select an available time. If your preferred time is not available you will be added to a waiting list and notified if it becomes available.

Please phone reception (01865 274646) if you have any questions.

Graduate Insights for Disabled Students

Blogged by Polly Metcalfe on October 9, 2015.

Becky Coleman is a disabled graduate working for Unilever in HR on the HR UFLP (Unilever Future Leaders Programme) graduate scheme. She has also previously had an industrial placement year at GSK.

On 23rd October 11am – 12 noon and on 26th October 2-3pm she’ll be running video calls (a bit like a Skype call) where students with disabilities can find out more about life at Unilever from Becky, who has a range of disabilities. You will have the opportunity to find out more about Unilever as a company, as well as the application process. There will also be the opportunity for students to ask any questions.

The calls are open to students from any degree course who have a disability/disabilities and who are looking for a graduate programme, summer placement, spring placement or industrial placement year.

If you would like to join the call please send an email to with your preferred session date in the subject line by 5pm on 22nd October and she’ll ensure you are sent the login for the call.

Please be aware spaces on the calls are limited and are offered on a first come first served basis.

Student helpers needed for fairs

Blogged by John Gilbert on October 9, 2015.

Your help is needed! Do you have an interest in events and/or earning a few extra pennies??

The Careers Service regularly offer part time opportunities to students and we are currently looking for students to help out at the Michaelmas Term Careers Fairs. These fairs are great fun and a good addition to your CV!

The first fair is on 21 October (you can see the dates of other fairs on our fairs webpage). Rate of pay is £7.88 per hour.

The work will involve helping fair attendees (students and employers), as well as assisting Careers Service Staff. Please note that some manual lifting will be required.

The roles include assisting in setting up the exhibition stands (assembling display panels, arranging tables, chairs and linen etc.), arrange for materials that have been delivered to the venue to be taken to the employers stand, meet and greet employers on their arrival to the fair and assist with carrying any materials. During the fair responsibilities will include ensuring that employers have sufficient water and refreshments and taking away any rubbish. At the end of the fair, assisting employers with any materials that are required to be taken to cars/coaches on their departure, taking down display stands and clearing away.

If you are interested in helping out, please contact Keren Young, Employer Relations Team Leader by emailing to express your interest, and she will email you further details in due course.

Meet Nomura one-to-one

Posted on behalf of Nomura. Blogged by Employer Relations Team on October 8, 2015.

Would you appreciate having a practice interview or advice on your CV from a real employer?

On Monday 19th October, Nomura will be providing you with practical advice and tips on how to make your application stand out, in one of the Careers Service’s “Recruiter in Residence” sessions. The investment banking recruitment process is highly competitive and these one-to-one informal appointments are designed to help you navigate the recruitment process, understand what investment banks look for, strengthen your CVs and cover letters and learn practical ways to prepare for interviews.

Appointments are available 1 week prior to each event. To make an appointment you will need to book your time slot through CareerConnect. Login to CareerConnect and search under events, click on ‘Book Now’ and select an available time. If your preferred time is not available you will be added to a waiting list and notified if it becomes available.

Please phone reception (01865 274646) if you have any questions.

Meet PwC one-to-one

Posted on behalf of PwC. Blogged by Employer Relations Team on October 8, 2015.

On Monday 19th October, PwC will be holding one-to-one, informal appointments with students at the Careers Service in a “Recruiter-in-Residence” session. Get an expert assessment of your current employability skills. An insight into what the big graduate employers are looking for. And valuable advice that will help boost your chances of getting that job you really want.

These one-to-one sessions with recruiters at PwC can really make your prospects brighter. Not only will you discover where your strengths and weaknesses lie. You’ll also be able to pinpoint what you could do to make yourself more attractive to graduate recruiters. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to come and meet us. You could walk away with some great ideas about your future. It doesn’t matter what year you’re in or what you’re studying, we have opportunities for students in every year group and from all degree subjects.

Appointments are available 1 week prior to each event. To make an appointment you will need to book your time slot through CareerConnect. Login to CareerConnect and search under events, click on ‘Book Now’ and select an available time. If your preferred time is not available you will be added to a waiting list and notified if it becomes available.

Please phone reception (01865 274646) if you have any questions.

This page displays current related blog posts. If none display, you can still stay up-to-date with our newsletter sent regularly to all Oxford students.

Older posts can be found in our archive of past blogs.